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Nissan LEAF

Nissan Leaf, courtesy of Nissan
Nissan Leaf, courtesy of Nissan
Nissan Leaf charge ports (CHAdeMO and J1772), courtesy of Nissan
Nissan Leaf interior, courtesy of Nissan
Nissan Leaf Fuel Economy Label

Description

The Nissan LEAF was built from the ground up to be an EV. It is a 5-seater, 4-door hatchback based on Versa/Tiida platform. The LEAF has an 80kW electric motor, powered by Nissan/NEC Li-ion batteries stowed in the floorboard of the vehicle. The batteries will recharge in about 4 hours from a home charger and will charge from 0-80% in less than 30 minutes with a DC quick charger. The 2013 LEAF includes a new "S" model, which has a lower price point. The 2013 model also has an available 6.6kW charger, which reduces charge time to 4 hours on a Level 2 circuit.

Nissan LEAF Information Video

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Specs

Vehicle Type: 
Cars & Trucks
Drivetrain: 
EV
Range: 
107 mi
Target: 
Now Available
Top Speed: 
90 mph
Connector Type: 
J1772
Connector Type: 
CHAdeMO
Price (USD): 
$29,010

Comments

Richard  Tucker's picture

Nissan is a good brand and

Nissan is a good brand and this nissan leaf is really looking goods..Almost all features have been covered, I Wish this car would also be available in my country :-)
Chris's picture

sick car

I have always been a big fan of the Nissan cars. They last forever. Hope it will be just as good as every other nissan I have owned.
paul william's picture

Nissan LEAF Electric Car

Nissan Leaf is the good line of car. I think so! Thank you for your helpful article!
Anonymous's picture

I think what you are asking

I think what you are asking is if it's okay to drive your vehicle and then park it for 6-7 months and repeat. Yes that's okay the most damage you beat your tires because I'll be sitting in the exact same spot for half a year causing uneven wear. Parking in a garage and lifting it on jacks will take care of the tire issue. The good news is you can remotely start the climate control from anywhere in the U.S.using the "Carwings" app. That will give you feedback as to your battery health. The Nissan Leaf has the ability to start and stop with charger but for safety reasons I wouldn't just leave it plugged in for months on end. I hope this answers your question.
Josh's picture

Hope that Nissan LEAF car

Hope that Nissan LEAF car will be available in our country.
Orville's picture

Dilson Decano?

Orayt!
Anonymous's picture

Winter Non-Use

I'm thinking of keeping a Leaf at my summer home in Cape Cod, in the garage and plugged into the 110 wall outlet. Would this be safe and effective over seven or so months?
Anonymous's picture

Winter non-use

No, it has been reported that the Leaf doesn't manage its 12V accessory battery well when plugged into a charger. If you leave it plugged in, the vehicle periodically (every 15 minutes?) checks the status of the charging cable, which uses power from the 12v battery. If you leave it like this over the winter you'll come back in the summer to a leaf with a dead 12v battery and you won't be able to start the car until you recharge the 12v battery. The community recommendation is to charge to roughly 50% charge on the main battery (the battery is the most stable at 50% charge) and then leave it sitting WITHOUT the EVSE plugged in. So, if you can periodically get back to check the charge (or use Carwings to check until it goes away at the end of 2016) you'll be okay.
Anonymous's picture

Winter non-use

No, it has been reported that the Leaf doesn't manage its 12V accessory battery well when plugged into a charger. If you leave it plugged in, the vehicle periodically (every 15 minutes?) checks the status of the charging cable, which uses power from the 12v battery. If you leave it like this over the winter you'll come back in the summer to a leaf with a dead 12v battery and you won't be able to start the car until you recharge the 12v battery. The community recommendation is to charge to roughly 50% charge on the main battery (the battery is the most stable at 50% charge) and then leave it sitting WITHOUT the EVSE plugged in. So, if you can periodically get back to check the charge (or use Carwings to check until it goes away at the end of 2016) you'll be okay.
James's picture

LEAF is great car

I have a leased LEAF since July last year. It gets about 92 miles per charge. I use the 110 volt charging system. We have saved on fuel and maintenance issues and a low $197 per month lease. This is better than we were doing with the previous Honda Insight. The LEAF handles great with excellent response time, etc. Roomy car with nice interior features and as 's' model only lacks the navigation system.

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